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Elective Home Education (EHE)

Educating your child at home

Elective Home Education is where parents choose to exercise their legal right to take responsibility for educating their children at home or at home and in some other way which they choose, instead of sending them to school full time. This is different to education which may be provide ‘otherwise than at school’ for example tuition for children who are too ill to attend. It is parents who are responsible for ensuring that their children receive a suitable education. While most parents aim to do this by sending their children to school, some parents choose to educate their children at home.

Educating a child full-time at home can be a rewarding but challenging task. Parents may choose to engage private tutors to assist in providing a suitable education, but there is no requirement to do so. The local authority recognises that there are a range of styles that a parent may choose, to educate their child at home, including but not exclusively, school at home, autonomous learning, child centered approaches and experiential learning.

The decision to Electively Home Educate should be taken solely by parents and schools should not seek to influence or pressure parents to opt to educate their children at home.

The documents below reflect Suffolk County Council’s current strategy, policy and procedures relating to Elective Home Education based on the government’s guidance to local authorities 2016.

Considering Elective Home Education?

If you are considering Elective Home education and would like some further information, we have tried to provide answers to frequently asked questions below as a starting point. If your child is currently in school,  we would urge you to contact the school and arrange to meet and discuss this with the school and we welcome calls to the EHE advisor team if your feel that you need further information of advice before making the decision.

Full details about considering Elective Home Education can be found here

Guide for parents

EHE Drop sessions

Drop in sessions are held throughout the year for parents that are currently home educating.

At the drop-in session you will have an opportunity to meet the EHE Consultant to find out about local educational resources for EHE children, Suffolk’s approach to EHE or to simply discuss and ask any questions you may have. Your children are welcome to attend with you.

Upcoming dates will be added to this page once they have been arranged.

NSFT First response

The Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust launched their First Response helpline. The helpline is staffed by trained mental health professionals who will be able to listen to concerns and help people get the support they need. Call 24/7 on 0808 196 3494. For more information visit: https://www.nsft.nhs.uk/Find-help/Pages/Helpline.aspx

There are a number of organisations providing mental health support listed here

Education Otherwise - KIT Award

The Elective Home Education Team has been awarded with the KIT Award for Excellence. In recognition of the passion and commitment to excellence in support of home education. 

Frequently asked questions

1.  What is Elective Home Education (EHE)?

2.  What is the law relating to Elective Home Education?

3.  What are parents’ rights and responsibilities?

4.  What is ‘suitable’ education?

5.  I have decided to home educate – what should I do?

6.  Do I have to be a qualified teacher?

7.  Do I have to tell the local authority that I am home educating?

8.  Does the local authority provide any funding?

9.  What about children with Special Educational Needs (SEN)?

10.  Can my child attend school part-time?

11.  Do I have to be inspected or monitored?

12.  What should my child learn?

13.  Do you have information about examinations?

14.  Where can I get help and support?

15.  Can I arrange work experience?

16.  Further Education/Careers Information for Young People

17.  What do I do if I want to return my child to school?

18.  What is ‘Raising the Participation Age (RPA)’?

19.  What are the local authority’s procedures?

 

1.  What is Elective Home Education (EHE)?

Parents are responsible for ensuring that their children receive a suitable education.  While most parents aim to do this by sending their children to school, some parents choose to educate their children at home.

Elective Home Education is the term used by the Department for Education (DfE) to describe parents‘ decisions to provide education for their children other than by sending them to school. This is different from home tuition provided by a local authority, and different from education provided by a local authority other than at a school.

In Suffolk we respect this right of parents. Our aim is to work constructively with parents to help them promote their children’s learning and development. We seek to establish relationships with parents that are based on mutual understanding and respect.


2.  What is the law relating to Elective Home Education?

Parents have a right to educate their children at home. Section 7 of the Education Act 1996 provides that:

 ‘The parent of every child of compulsory school age shall cause him/her to receive efficient full time education suitable –

 a)    to his/her age, ability and aptitude and
 b)    to any Special Educational Needs s/he may have, either by regular attendance at school or otherwise’.

Elective Home Education is the ‘otherwise’ part. An ‘efficient’ and ‘suitable’ education is not defined in the Education Act 1996 but ‘efficient’ has been broadly described in case law1 as an education that ‘achieves that which it sets out to achieve’, and a ‘suitable’ education is one that ‘primarily equips a child for life within the community of which he is a member, rather than the way of life in the country as a whole, as long as it does not foreclose the child's options in later years to adopt some other form of life if he wishes to do so’. There is currently no legal definition of ‘full-time’.

1 Mr Justice Woolf in the case of R v Secretary of State for Education and Science , ex parte Talmud Torah Machzikei Hadass School Trust (12 April 1985).


3.  What are parents’ rights and responsibilities?

Parents must ensure that their children receive suitable full-time education for as long as they are being educated at home.

Parents may decide to exercise their right to home educate their child from a very early age and so the child may not have been previously enrolled at school. They may also elect to home educate at any other stage up to the end of compulsory school age.

Parents do not need to seek the permission of the local authority to educate their children at home (unless their child is registered at a school as a result of a school attendance order). If a child attends a special school, the school cannot remove the child’s name from the register without the permission of the local authority.  Where parents are funding a place for their child at an independent special school, they do not require permission from the local authority to de-register.

Schools must not seek to persuade parents to educate their children at home as a way of avoiding an exclusion or because the child has a poor attendance record.

Parents who choose to educate their children at home assume full financial responsibility for the educational costs, including the cost of arranging examinations and paying the examination fees.  In the case of children with a Statement of Special Educational Needs or Education, Health & Care plan, please refer to the section below on SEN.

The type of educational activity can be varied and flexible. It is recognised that home-educating parents are not required to:

  • teach the National Curriculum
  • provide a broad and balanced curriculum
  • have a timetable
  • have premises equipped to any particular standard
  • set hours during which education will take place
  • have any specific qualifications
  • make detailed plans in advance
  • observe school hours, days or terms
  • give formal lessons
  • mark work done by their child
  • formally assess progress or set development objectives
  • reproduce school type peer group socialisation
  • match school-based, age-specific standards.

4.  What is ‘suitable’ education?

Courts have defined a ‘suitable’ education as one that equips a child for life within the community of which the child is a member, rather than the way of life in the country as a whole, as long as it does not foreclose the child’s options in later years to adopt some other form of life if the child wishes to do so.

‘Full-time’ education does not mean keeping to the same hours that a child would have in school.  In home education there is often almost continuous one-to-one contact and education may take place outside normal school hours.  There is currently no legal definition of ‘full-time’.

As previously mentioned, home educating parents do not have to teach the National Curriculum but familiarity with it is likely to be an advantage should your child return to school. 

In line with the most recent guidance from the government [DCSF (2007), Elective Home Education Guidelines for Local Authorities, we would expect parents’ provision of education at home to include the following characteristics:

  • consistent involvement of parents or other significant carers
  • recognition of the child’s needs, attitudes and aspirations
  • opportunities for the child to be stimulated by his or her learning experiences 
  • access to resources.

We appreciate that parents and their children might require a period of adjustment before finding their preferred mode of learning, which may change over time.


5.  I have decided to home educate – what should I do?

Informing the school in writing will require the school to remove your child’s name from the register (a sample deregistration letter can be found on the Education Otherwise website).The school then informs the local authority of your child’s removal from the school roll.  The Elective Home Education Consultant will then contact you and ask for some basic information and make a request to complete the Parental Confirmation of Elective Home Education form.

Parents may choose to employ other people to educate their child, but parents will continue to be responsible for the education provided.  They will also be responsible for ensuring that those whom they engage are suitable to have access to children.  Parents are advised to satisfy themselves by taking up appropriate references and Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks (previously CRB checks); which the people employed should be able to produce.

If your child is not yet of statutory school age and you intend to educate him or her at home, it would be very helpful if you inform the relevant consultant.


6.  Do I have to be a qualified teacher?

You don’t have to be a qualified teacher; many home educators have no teaching qualifications and may be learning alongside their children.


7.  Do I have to tell the local authority that I am home educating?

If your child has never been to school or you are new to the area you do not have to inform the local authority. However, it would be helpful for us for you to do so by completing the Parental Confirmation of Elective Home Education form.

If a child is on the roll of a Suffolk school the school should not delete the child's name from their admissions register until they have received written notification from the parents that the pupil is receiving education otherwise than at school. The school will then inform the local authority of your child’s removal from the school roll.  The Elective Home Education Consultant will then contact you and ask for some basic information and make a request to complete the Parental Confirmation of Elective Home Education form.


8.  Does the local authority provide any funding?

The simple answer to this question is ‘No’. Please remember that local authorities have no legal responsibility or obligation to fund parents or carers who choose to home educate. You will need to look at the costs that may be involved (equipment, visits, books, tutors etc.) and plan what you intend to do before home educating. In common with many local authorities, Suffolk does not provide direct funding or resources (e.g. exercise or text books, pens, pencils or paper, home computers etc.).

Parents who choose to educate their children at home must be prepared to assume full financial responsibility, including bearing the cost of any public examinations.


9.  What about children with Special Educational Needs (SEN)?

The right of parents to educate their child at home applies equally when a child has SEN. Where a child has a Statement of SEN or an Education, Health & Care (EHC) plan and is Electively Home Educated, it remains the local authority’s duty to ensure that the child’s needs are met and therefore, the Statement/EHC plan will continue to be reviewed annually via the Statutory Annual Review process.

If a child has a special school named in the Statement or EHC plan, the local authority will need to give its ‘consent’ to the parent undertaking Elective Home Education. The pupil will remain on the roll of the special school until such time as consent is given. Should consent not be given, then the local authority will expect the pupil to attend the special school named in Statement of SEN/EHC plan. If the pupil does not attend the special school named, the local authority will pursue a School Attendance Order.

With regard to access to health provision for electively home educated children (such as Speech and Language Therapy, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy) we would advise parents to request intervention through their GP.

A parent who is Electively Home Educating their child may ask the local authority to carry out a Statutory Assessment or reassessment of their child’s Special Educational Needs.


10.  Can my child attend school part-time?

Part time attendance is an arrangement (between the parent and the school) by which the child is registered at school but attends part time; the rest of the time the child is electively home educated.  Part time attendance is a legal option, but it depends on the agreement of the head teacher.  The child will be required to follow the National Curriculum whilst at school but not whilst he or she is being electively home educated.

The GOV.UK home education web page also says "Write to the headteacher if you plan to take your child out of school. They must accept if you're taking your child out completely. They can refuse if you want to send your child to school some of the time."


11.  Do I have to be inspected or monitored?

Local authorities have no statutory duties in relation to monitoring the quality of home education on a routine basis.  When we become aware that you are home educating your child, we will contact you to ask for some basic information such as child's name and date of birth as well as preferred contact details.  We will also ask how you wish to provide the local authority with information about your home education.  Providing we have no concerns we will normally be in touch once a year to check that you are still electively home educating and your contact details haven’t changed.  If you move house or your child starts school we would be grateful if you could let us know.


12.  What should my child learn?

This question is often asked by parents.  As stated above, you do not need to follow the National Curriculum. We fully acknowledge that parents have considerable choice over the shape and delivery of their provision.


13.  Do you have information about examinations?

Parents who choose to educate their children at home assume full financial responsibility for the educational costs, including the cost of arranging examinations and paying the examination fees. Children may have to go to an examination centre to sit papers and parents will have to pay the costs involved but parents do have the advantage of selecting the board whose external syllabus most suits their child.

Useful introductory information on exams can also be found at the home educator Ed Yourself. Other information is available from organisations such as Education Otherwise.

Some Suffolk schools, academies and FE colleges may be willing to allow external candidates to access some courses and sit examinations. Contact details for Suffolk schools are available on the Suffolk County Council website.

Further information can be found in the GCSE helpsheet.


14.  Where can I get help and support?

1. Suffolk's Home Education Consultants will be able to give you information about books and websites that are popular with home-educators. Also, a useful resource list can be found by using the following links: Primary age resources list and Secondary age resource list

2. National organisations that support home-educators include:

  • Education Otherwise (www.educationotherwise.org), 61 Bridge Street, Kington, HR5 3DJ, Telephone: 0300 1245690 Email: enquiries@educationotherwise.org 

3. Department for Education information:
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education

4. National Curriculum:
https://www.gov.uk/national-curriculum


15.  Can I arrange work experience?

Electively Home Educated children may take part in work experience that is arranged by their parents. Parents should consider the extent to which their children are covered by the health and safety, child protection and insurance provisions of the workplace.


16.  Further Education/Careers Information for Young People

National Careers Service (https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/Pages/Home.aspx) National careers information and advice helpline: 0800 100 900 (open every day 8am – 10pm).

The Source (Suffolk) 0800 085 4448 (http://www.thesource.me.uk/) The Source website provides access to information and advice on courses, jobs, apprenticeships, careers, money, housing and health for young people.

Contact information for Suffolk Youth Support Workers and Drop-In Centres are available on the ‘The Source’ website.


17.  What do I do if I want to return my child to school?

For various reasons you may decide that your child should return to school and we will always be willing to offer a place for your child at a Suffolk school. If you decide to return your child to school you will need to apply for a place at your preferred school provision. 

Suffolk County Council Admissions Team will provide you with detailed information, advice and guidance on applying for a place, and on the appeals process should admission be refused to a particular school.

Should you have concerns about returning your child to school you may wish to contact the SENDIASS service (01473 265210 during Monday to Friday office hours or email sendiass@suffolk.gov.uk).

Alternatively, you may wish to write to the Elective Home Education department explaining that you have been home educating your child but no longer wish to do so and seek information and advice on returning you child to school.

Elective Home Education
Children and Young People Services
Suffolk County Council
Endeavour House
8 Russell Road
Ipswich
IP1 2BX

Email: EHE@suffolk.gov.uk


18.  What is ‘Raising the Participation Age (RPA)’?

Parents can electively home educate and provide a suitable education for as long as their child is of compulsory school age.

Some parents have home educated their children beyond the age of 16 in order to comply with the duty of young people (aged 16 and 17) participating in education or employment with training until their 18th birthday.

This duty of participating in education or employment with training (until their child’s 18th birthday) relates to the government initiative known as ‘Raising the Participation Age (RPA)’.

Most children will continue (until their 18th birthday) in education or employment with training through the following programmes of learning:

  1. full-time study in a school, college or with a training provider (at least 540 Guided Learning Hours per year - i.e. 15hrs per week over 36 weeks of an academic year).
  2. full-time work or volunteering (20 hours or more per week for 8 or more consecutive weeks) combined with part-time education or training (at least 280 Guided Learning Hours per year).
  3. an apprenticeship or traineeship.
  4. an engagement programme designed to move the young person into one of the above.

If a 16 or 17 year old is home educated until their 18th birthday, no hourly requirement of education applies. The amount and content of home education is at the discretion of the home educator. However, at this age we would strongly advise the young person seeks advice and guidance that will encourage, enable and assist them to participate in education or employment with training. This support can be sought from our Early Help Specialist Youth Support Service by going to www.thesource.me.uk

We also recommend the following website: www.ICANBEA.org.uk

Below are some links that may assist in discovering further information regarding ‘Raising the Participation Age (RPA)’.

https://www.gov.uk/know-when-you-can-leave-school

https://www.gov.uk/government/policies/increasing-opportunities-for-young-people-and-helping-them-to-achieve-their-potential/supporting-pages/raising-the-participation-age


19.  What are the local authority’s procedures?

Suffolk recognises that there are many, equally valid, approaches to educational provision. What is suitable for one child may not be for another, but all children should be involved in a learning process. Suffolk seeks to provide parents who home educate with information and advice through the work of its Home Education Consultants. Contact details for the consultants are available below.

As well as providing information and advice, consultants help the authority discharge its statutory duties. The government expects that local authorities ‘should make enquiries with parents educating children at home about the educational provision being made for them’ so that the local authorities can ‘determine whether any children who are not pupils at schools, such as those being educated at home, are receiving suitable education’ [Paragraph 87, DCSF (2009) Revised statutory guidance for local authorities in England to identify children not receiving a suitable education].

Our procedures and approach are outlined in the PDF document Suffolk Elective Home Education Procedures.

Contact us

Suffolk seeks to provide parents considering home education with information and advice through the work of its Home Education Consultants. 

For enquiries, or to make contact with the Home Education Consultant for your area, please contact:

Elective Home Education
Children and Young People's Services
Suffolk County Council
Endeavour House
8 Russell Road
Ipswich
IP1 2BX

Telephone: 01473 265139
Email: EHE@suffolk.gov.uk

View the Elective Home Education Team leaflet

Information for schools

The law in England allows parents to educate their children at home instead of sending them to school. It is the parents’ responsibility to ensure that their child receives an efficient full time education, suitable to age, ability, and aptitude, and any special needs s/he may have. Parents of a child registered at a maintained or an independent school, must inform the school formally in writing of their intention to de-register (a sample deregistration letter can be found on the Education Otherwise website). This communication, be it letter, or email must indicate clearly that the parents intend to take responsibility for their child’s education and cannot simply be a request to remove from the roll. The communicated must be written by the parent themselves and in those cases where English is not the parents first language, a parent can provide this in their first language. It should then be translated to ensure the parent has clearly indicated a wish to educate electively home. 

Parents do not have to ask for permission or seek approval to home educate. It does not make a difference if the child has an Education Health and Care Plan unless the child is a registered pupil at a specialist placement, in which case the parent must request the consent of the local authority before the child's name can be deleted from the school roll. Please contact the EHE team directly for support with specialist placement, consent for  removal from roll.

Schools must not seek to persuade parents to educate their children at home as a way of avoiding an exclusion or because the child has a poor attendance record. In the case of exclusion, they must follow the statutory guidance. If the pupil has a poor attendance record, the school and local authority must address the issues behind the absenteeism and use the other remedies available to them.

Withdrawal from school to electively home educate

When a school receives written notification from a parent of their intention to home educate their child, it is the responsibility of the school to:

  • acknowledge the parents’ letter in writing and to delete the child’s name from the school register. The local authority (LA) requires the school to do this within 3 working days of receiving the parents’ letter.
  • inform the LA immediately of the removal of the child’s name from the register (Section 12 (3) of 'The Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006'). Schools should inform the LA of the removal of a child’s name from the register via the CME schools portal
  • Complete and send to the EHE team an EHE form 1

Where a parent does inform a school, they are considering EHE then SCC strongly recommends:

  • schools convene a meeting to talk through parents’ reasons to home educate their child/children and resolve any issues about school and the child's needs that might influence the parents’ decision to continue with their attendance at the school. As a result, parents will be fully aware of their responsibilities and if there are any concerns that the school may have regarding their decision to home educate. The meeting could be attended by an EHE officer if this would be supportive to the parent.
  • that parents are given contact details and advised to seek advice from SCC’s EHE team before formally asking the school to remove the child from the school roll
  • where appropriate both the school and parents should consider support offered through the SCC’s Early Help Team (EHT), where families are considering home education as means of addressing wider unmet needs or unresolved issues.
  • If the child/young person is subject to an EHC plan or has additional needs that have previously been supported in school, the school could arrange an early annual review / review of needs and record this request along with any new information in the review. This would be an opportunity to update any unmet needs and consider how provision within school could be adjusted or if further referrals to other services, which would not be available to the child once home educated, could be made to support the child, and perhaps ease any concerns from the parent

Withdrawal from a special school to electively home educate

Local authorities may encourage parents to inform them directly of the withdrawal of a child from school, but have no legal right to insist that parents do so. The only exception to this is where the child is attending a special school under arrangements made by the local authority, in which case additional permission is required from the authority before the child's name can be removed from the register.  When a special school receives written notification from a parent of their intention to home educate their child, it is the responsibility of the school to inform the Elective Home Education department and the Family Services coordinator. The Local Authority will then speak to the parent to make arrangements for them to share information. It is the expectation that this will not be a lengthy process and that the child will continue to attend the school until consent to remove from roll is given.

School Attendance Orders

If a child is registered at a school as a result of a school attendance order the parents must have the order revoked by the local authority on the ground that arrangements have been made for the child to receive suitable education otherwise than at school, before the child can be deleted from the school's register and educated at home.

Flexi-schooling

Part time attendance is an arrangement (between the parent and the school) by which the child is registered at school but attends part time; the rest of the time the child is electively home educated. Part time attendance is a legal option, but it depends on the agreement of the head teacher and governing body. The child will be required to follow the National Curriculum whilst at school but not whilst he or she is being electively home educated.

Schools may enter into flexi-schooling arrangements provided they correctly mark children as absent in attendance registers when they are being educated at home.

The GOV.UK web page containing the Home Education Guidelines says "Pupils who are being flexi-schooled should be marked as absent from school during the periods when they are receiving home education."

The GOV.UK home education web page also says "Write to the headteacher if you plan to take your child out of school. They must accept if you’re taking your child out completely. They can refuse if you want to send your child to school some of the time.” 

Elective Home Education

Elective Home Education
Children and Young People's Services
Suffolk County Council
Endeavour House
8 Russell Road
Ipswich
IP1 2BX

Telephone: 01473 265139
Email: EHE@suffolk.gov.uk

College links

Suffolk New College 14-16 offer Update

Suffolk New College have been in touch with the Elective Home education team and shared the following information. We are aware that this decision may have an impact on the future plans of many Elective Home Educated families. If you would like to discuss this with the Elective Home Education consultants or advisors, please email EHE@suffolk.gov.uk or call business support on 01473 265139 who will be happy to pass on your details to your local consultant.

‘Suffolk New College have in the past chosen to offer a small Number of Electively Home educated students access to a range of courses. However, in recent months, Ofsted rules around Direct Entry of 14-16’s in college have changed. Suffolk New College is not a direct entry College and as such cannot respond to the larger numbers of applications now being received from Electively Home Educated students.

As a result of this change, we have reached the decision that we will not accept applications from any new 14-16 home educated students from September 2020. A few 14-16 students already enrolled at the college for the 19/20 academic year will be able to remain with us in 20/21 to complete their studies. We are meeting this commitment to allow them to complete their studies without moving settings.’


Below is a list of colleges and contact details;

West Suffolk College (http://www.westsuffolkcollege.ac.uk/)

Out Risbygate
Bury St Edmunds
Suffolk 
IP33 3RL

Telephone: 01284 716333
Email: info@wsc.ac.uk

Suffolk One (http://www.suffolkone.ac.uk/)

One
Scrivener Drive
Ipswich
Suffolk
IP8 3SU

Main Switchboard: 01473 556600
Email: admin@suffolkone.ac.uk

Easton & Otley College (https://www.eastonotley.ac.uk/)

Easton Campus

Easton
Norwich
Norfolk
NR9 5DX

Course enquiries and applications 08000 224556

College of West Anglia (http://www.cwa.ac.uk/)

The College of West Anglia King's Lynn Campus
Tennyson Avenue
King's Lynn 
Norfolk 
PE30 2QW

Telephone: 01553 761144
Email: enquiries@col-westanglia.ac.uk

The College of West Anglia Cambridge Campus
Landbeach Road
Milton
Cambridgeshire 
CB24 6DB

Telephone: 01223 860701
Email: enquiries@col-westanglia.ac.uk

Gt. Yarmouth College (http://www.gyc.ac.uk/)

Great Yarmouth College
Suffolk Road
Southtown
Great Yarmouth
Norfolk
NR31 0ED

Email: info@gyc.ac.uk
Telephone: 01493 655261

Norwich City College (http://www.ccn.ac.uk/)

City College Norwich
Ipswich Road
Norwich
NR2 2LJ

Email: information@ccn.ac.uk
Telephone: 01603 773311

Lowestoft College (www.lowestoft.ac.uk)

Lowestoft College
St. Peter's Street
Lowestoft
Suffolk
NR32 2NB

General Enquiries: 01502 583521
Course Enquiries: 0800 854 695

Useful downloads

Below is a list of useful documents;

Latest news and events

SENDIASS

SENDIASS Information Sessions for Families Autumn 2022

New EHC needs assessment FAQ – around seeking specialist advice

Following requests, we published an additional FAQ with our advice for parents about asking for particular advice for an EHC needs assessment: EHCNA and plans FAQ’s (no. 16) and on our Assessments page.

Website and resources

Please continue to guide families to use our website which is packed pull of impartial information and advice, and includes FAQ’s across topics (SEN Support, Choosing a School, EHC needs assessments and plans) and includes information about the options for raising concerns with settings or services. The information and advice we provide whether online or in our leaflets, through our information sessions or directly by email or phone, is based firmly in the law. SENDIASS staff receive accredited legal training and follow a set of national Minimum Standards. Families can be confident they will receive accurate, impartial information and advice from our service which helps them have the confidence to work as equal partners in discussions.

SENDIASS Annual Report for the period 2020 to 2021

Naming a setting in an EHC plan:

We continue to receive lots of enquiries about naming a school in an EHC plan and have updated our factsheet for families: ‘How do I name a school in an EHC plan?

SEN Support – Video for young people

This short 3 minute video (available on our YouTube channel and website) explains how SEND children and young people get help in education settings, including who to talk to:
https://youtu.be/-rYRBKv7W64

SENDIASS website

Our website is a well-used resource, packed with information and advice for families. In August we moved our website to a new platform. Feedback from our survey and sessions with groups of young people input to the design and navigation features.  We strive for continuous improvement, and we want to continue to gather feedback – please take a look at our website and give feedback by completing our survey. Alternatively, you can email us at enquiries@suffolksendiass.co.uk

Myth-busting about the need for a diagnosis

We were recently alerted by health colleagues to general misconceptions about the need for a diagnosis in terms of ‘SEN support’ and securing an ‘EHC plan’. We have two FAQ’s on our website which cover these issues specifically, and we have published the first of two posts on social media which link to this information. Please get in touch if you have ideas for other myths we can help dispel.

Language games to play at home 

A relaxed online session hosted by SENDIASS and presented by specialist teachers from the Speech, Language and Communication service. This session will explore ideas for supporting children with these needs to develop their language and will be repeated in the evening too.

23rd November 2022      

10am – 11am and repeated at 6pm – 7pm

Click here to register for the morning session

Click here to register for the evening session

SEND Support in Schools 

Our next face-to-face SEND session, this time in Ipswich. See flyer for details. Please only book if you believe you will be able to attend.

30th November 10am – 1pm

Treehouse Family Hub

251 Clapgate Lane, Ipswich IP3 0RH

Click to register


Suffolk Academy of Dance and Performing Arts